Tuesday, 3 May 2022

Spoonbill at Black Hole Marsh

The decent year for (locally) scarce birds on patch continues! Spoonbills are more or less annual on patch, some years none, some years more than one (like this year), and always a joy to see. I had Black Hole Marsh entirely to myself when I saw this beauty drop in.



At dusk a lot more birds came in to BHM, including 14+ Whimbrel and 2 Bar-tailed Godwits.


Saturday, 30 April 2022

Green-winged Teal finally shows nicely

 ...but only for a few seconds. It was on the pool by the Discovery Hut, which is the area I thought it went down in when it flew from Black Hole Marsh on the 18th. 


25th - I had a gorgeous sum plum Barwit on Black Hole Marsh which was joined by a 2nd on 27th

26th - a Cattle Egret flew SW over Seaton, 3 Whimbrel on the estuary

28th - a decidedly less attractive Barwit joined 1 of the 2 sum plum birds

29th - 2 Barwits (1 sum plum), 5 Whimbrel and 3 Ringos


Taken after the Sun went down when most people would have long packed up the camera gear!


Monday, 18 April 2022

Green-winged Teal at Black Hole Marsh

I thought I'd missed my chance with the GW Teal on Bridge Marsh on 8th April (I was working), but rather unexpectedly it flew in through the rain and landed on BHM early evening today! I'm not aware of any other sightings between the 8th and now but it's likely the same bird and has presumably been staying somewhere local-ish. It flew in from north of BHM with 3 Teal and landed quite a way off... It didn't linger long and after it flew, a further 90 mins of searching didn't turn it up again either. It was nice to get a few other people onto it as well at least.

Poor pics due to distance, but great to see nonetheless.




Wednesday, 23 March 2022

White-winged surprise over my garden!

Glaucous Gull is definitely not something I was expecting to see over the garden today! I had my binoculars and (small) camera handy whilst I was working on my astro equipment outside, and it was just as well that I did. A scarce bird locally, and only the second I've seen on patch. It really did put a smile on my face, it just wasn't something I was expecting to see from home. I've had a few Meds over before, and a probable Iceland Gull over town (we had one on the Axe the following morning so the 'probable' became extremely likely), but still, a very nice surprise indeed!

Poor pics, but I care not.




There were reports of a WT Eagle over Beer at 16:25 on Tuesday, but before I was aware of this, I had a large bird flying high, away from me over Colyton at 16:48-16:50. I had my arms full of daughter, no bins, no underside view of the bird to show any diagnostic shape, but it was big, and the gulls were not impressed. I hope the GPS data gets released and shows that the bird I had heading NNE was not the eagle... Still not seen one, and want to see one properly when it does eventually happen.


Sunday, 13 March 2022

Cattle Egrets in Colyton

We've had a few Cattle Egrets frequenting Colyton for quite a while now, numbering up to 5 on occasion. They've been relatively obliging at times, primarily using the same 4 fields. I expect the novelty will somewhat wear off with these in the next few years, but I do rather like them (especially the 2 full breeding plumage birds I had last year)!

Birding time has been a bit sparse lately, as has time to eat or sleep. Having both Delta & Omicron in the house within 4 weeks of each other wasn't ideal either, especially with a 1 year old. 

Roll on Spring.







Saturday, 29 January 2022

ISS transit of the Moon! And flat-earthers...

A lunar transit of the International Space Station is something I've wanted to capture for a long, long time. It's difficult in the UK as clear skies are hard to come by, especially, it seems, when you want them most. Using an online ISS tracker, I knew that there was an opportunity to capture such an event quite close to home, so lots of planning later and I was all ready to go on the 19th of January.

The ISS passed in front of the Moon at approx 22:54, with the transit lasting close to 1 second. Yes, 1 second. You can imagine why this type of thing takes a lot of planning, as well as very careful execution.

I videoed the transit on 2 cameras (1 main, 1 backup), and made the image stacks from the footage, as well as from some stills taken just after the pass. It was a 96% moon on the night, but I decided to blend it with an image of the 100% full moon from 2 nights prior, to give it a nice 3D type feel. Not something I've tried previously, but it does make this final image feel more complete.


It's not very often a shoot ends with this sort of feeling, but all the prep and effort paid off.




Colour data was enhanced in post-processing for aesthetic purposes, but the colours here are naturally occurring. ISS positions are accurate and to scale, made from the 25 frames in the video that the ISS appeared in. To ensure each image of the ISS was sharp, I opted for a shutter speed of 1/2000s for the video. This was an educated guess as I've not attempted this before, but physics, maths & photography are kind of my thing(s), so I knew that this would do the job fairly well.

Here's the video footage, played at real-time speed, half speed and quarter speed:





Something I didn't consider at the time was just how triggered FLAT-EARTHERS would be by my night's work. I had one 'interesting' comment on my Facebook post, then another, and another in quick succession, so I soon realised that my post must have been shared somewhere a bit, shall we say, 'out there'. A bit of detective work from my good lady and we found the offending Facebook group, a 'flat-earth' group. It seems the ISS is a real problem for their 'movement' as it's one of the few things they can't provide any remotely conceivable explanation for.

I didn't find the comments annoying. In fact, the extent of delusion was so extraordinary that the comments were highly entertaining!

You're a NASA shill!
You work for NASA!
You're pushing lies for the government!
ISS is fake!
Earth is flat!
ISS is only the size of a football field, you can't see it at 250 miles!
It's the wrong size compared to a plane in front of the moon!
It was a modified plane!
The moon is really close to us inside the dome!
Etc.
Etc.
Etc.

I'm grateful for the laughs, so thanks to them for that! In fairness, the number of flat-earthers that I attracted was low as the images will have been seen by millions across the various platforms. But still, concerning nonetheless... 😂


Monday, 24 January 2022

Glossy Ibis photo

Iridescence! I was pleased to catch some iridescence without direct sunlight, as sunlight with field shots like this usually leads to horrible shadows and/or highlights.

There is a fair bit of video footage too but it's unlikely to make it off the PC; I've had a rather busy few days with astrophotography and replying to hundreds/thousands of people about some International Space Station pics/video!

More on that in the next post. It'll likely be worth your time...